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1: Fundamentals of Animal Physiology - Biology

1: Fundamentals of Animal Physiology - Biology


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  • 1.1: Features Used to Classify Animals
  • 1.2: Prelude to The Animal Body
    The structures of animals consist of primary tissues that make up more complex organs and organ systems. Homeostasis allows an animal to maintain a balance between its internal and external environments.
  • 1.3: Animal Form and Function
    Animals vary in form and function. From a sponge to a worm to a goat, an organism has a distinct body plan that limits its size and shape. Animals’ bodies are also designed to interact with their environments, whether in the deep sea, a rainforest canopy, or the desert. Therefore, a large amount of information about the structure of an organism's body (anatomy) and the function of its cells, tissues and organs (physiology) can be learned by studying that organism's environment.
  • 1.4: Animal Primary Tissues
    The tissues of multicellular, complex animals are four primary types: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous. Recall that tissues are groups of similar cells group of similar cells carrying out related functions. These tissues combine to form organs—like the skin or kidney—that have specific, specialized functions within the body. Organs are organized into organ systems to perform functions.
  • 1.5: Homeostasis
    Animal organs and organ systems constantly adjust to internal and external changes through a process called homeostasis (“steady state”). These changes might be in the level of glucose or calcium in blood or in external temperatures. Homeostasis means to maintain dynamic equilibrium in the body. It is dynamic because it is constantly adjusting to the changes that the body’s systems encounter. It is equilibrium because body functions are kept within specific ranges.
  • 1.E: The Animal Body - Basic Form and Function (Exercises)

Animal Science Major (B.S.)

The Animal Science B.S. is designed for students interested in animal agriculture. Students who are considering continuing their studies through graduate school are advised to take the recommended additional courses in Chemistry, Math and Physics. The Animal Science B.S. is one of many pathways for admission to veterinary school. Because admission to veterinary school is highly competitive due to the limited number of available spaces and the high standards for admission, students are advised to choose an academic program that deeply interests them. Simply taking the prerequisite courses required by veterinary schools without considering alternate career goals is not advisable.


Fundamentals of Microbiome Science: How Microbes Shape Animal Biology

This book provides an accessible and authoritative guide to the fundamental principles of microbiome science, an exciting and fast-emerging new discipline that is reshaping many aspects of the life sciences. Resident microbes in healthy animals&thinsp—&thinspincluding humans—can dictate many traits of the animal host. This animal microbiome is a second immune system conferring protection against pathogens it can structure host metabolism in animals as diverse as reef corals and hibernating mammals and it may influence animal behavior, from social recognition to emotional states. These microbial partners can also drive ecologically important traits, from thermal tolerance to diet, and have contributed to animal diversification over long evolutionary timescales.

Drawing on concepts and data across a broad range of disciplines and systems, Angela Douglas provides a conceptual framework for understanding these animal-microbe interactions while shedding critical light on the scientific challenges that lie ahead. Douglas explains why microbiome science demands creative and interdisciplinary thinking—the capacity to combine microbiology with animal physiology, ecological theory with immunology, and evolutionary perspectives with metabolic science.

An essential introduction to a cutting-edge field that is revolutionizing the life sciences, this book explains why microbiome science presents a more complete picture of the biology of humans and other animals, and how it can deliver novel therapies for many medical conditions and new strategies for pest control.

"Douglas has an encyclopedic knowledge of microbial systems, their ecology, and their metabolic functions with which she explains complex physiological mechanisms and identifies important research gaps. . . . Overall, reading this book is a most satisfying intellectual feast."—Fernando Vega, Science

"[Provides] an excellent and comprehensive account of microbiome science that will be valuable to both experts and students in the field."—Martin Kaltenpoth, The Quarterly Review of Biology

"Highly recommended. Angela Douglas has produced a book of great scholarship, clarity, and intelligence—and with the loving touch of a biologist. Douglas has much to teach students and experts alike."—Martin J. Blaser, author of Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of Antibiotics Is Fueling Our Modern Plagues

"This ambitious book surveys animal-microbe associations and reimagines the animal as a multi-organismal being. Douglas nicely balances conceptual points and detailed examples, making the text both accessible to anyone with a basic background in biology and interesting to specialists in symbiosis and microbiome science. Fundamentals of Microbiome Science is a very enjoyable read."—David Berry, University of Vienna

"A very significant contribution to the emerging field of animal-bacteria symbiosis. I am not aware of any other book that covers this topic so exhaustively and in such an integrated, up-to-date, and comprehensive manner."—François Leulier, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris

Related Books


Physiology

You might have noticed the resemblance between the words ‘Physics’ and 'Physiology' Isn't it?

there is reason for that. The word Physiology

can be traced back to the ancient Greek words

‘Physis’ and ‘logos’ which means nature

and philosophy respectively. Natural Philosophy is the

precursor of the field ‘natural science’.

Natural sciences deal with study of all-natural

phenomena existing in the universe both living

things and material universe. Both Physics

and Physiology are part of natural sciences.

Physics deals with material universe and the Physiology deals with functions within the living systems.

Study of all life phenomena is called as biology.

The branch of biology which studies the ‘logic

of life’ is Physiology and physiologists

try to answer the 'hows' and 'whys' of Biology.

The term Physiology itself was coined by French

Physician Jean Fernel. Who suggested it to be 'Physiologia' in french. In english it becomes Physiology

In this human Physiology course, we are going

to study functions at various levels of organization.

Some topics like a membrane transport is cellular

level and some are tissue level, like peristalsis

in smooth muscle tissue, some topics like

‘gastric emptying’ at organ level

and functions like digestion is studied at

organ system level and certain functions like

‘Glucose homeostasis’ at entire Organism

level. which involves multiple organ system. The chapters in this course are divided

according to organ system and the major focus

will be on organ level functions.

we are going to discuss some integrated functions also

In this course, we are going to focus on the

concepts which are essential for understanding

medicine. This branch is called as Medical

Physiology and It is the foundation for modern

medicine. when a human body deviates from its Physiology it is called a diseased state, a pathological state

the aim of medicine is to bring back the body from diseased state to its normal Physiology.

That is why study of medicine begins with

the study of its foundation medical Physiology.

Physiology is an experimental science. All our knowledge in Physiology comes from experimentation and mainly animal experiments


Major Requirements

Students must complete at least 36 credits from any EEB, MCB, or PNB course at the 2000 level or higher. Six credits must be at the 3000 level or higher. The 36 credits must include courses from the major requirements below.

Notes: A maximum of three independent study credits from EEB 3899 MCB 3899, 4896, 4989 and PNB 3299 may count toward the 36 credits. A maximum of eight 2000-level or above transfer credits in EEB, MCB, or PNB may count toward the major with approval of the respective department. PNB 2264 and 2265 cannot count toward the 36-credit requirement.

Introductory Biology Courses

Complete all of the following:

  • BIOL 1107. Principles of Biology I (4 credits) and
  • BIOL 1108. Principles of Biology II (4 credits) or BIOL 1110 Intro to Botany (4 credits)

Cells and Molecules Core Requirement

Complete one of the following courses:

  • MCB 2000. Introduction to Biochemistry (4 credits) or
  • MCB 2210. Cell Biology (3 credits) or MCB 2215. Honors Cell Biology (3 credits) or
  • MCB 2610. Fundamentals of Microbiology (4 credits)

Ecology Core Requirement

Complete one of the following courses: EEB 2244 or 2244W. General Ecology (4 credits)

Evolution Core Requirement

Complete one of the following courses: EEB 2245 or 2245W. Evolutionary Biology (3-4 credits)

Genetics Core Requirement

Complete one of the following courses: MCB 2400. Human Genetics or MCB 2410. Genetics (3 credits)

Physiology Core Requirement

Complete one of the following:

  • PNB 2250. Animal Physiology (3 credits) or
  • PNB 2274 and 2275. Enhanced Human Physiology & Anatomy (8 credits total)

Writing in the Major

Complete at least one of the following:

  • BIOL 3520W. Ethical Perspectives in Biological Research and Technology
  • EEB 2244W. General Ecology
  • EEB 2245W. Evolutionary Biology
  • EEB 3220W. Evolution of Green Plants
  • EEB 3244W. Writing in Ecology
  • EEB 4230W. Methods of Ecology
  • EEB 4276W. Plant Anatomy
  • EEB 4896W. Senior Research Thesis in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  • EEB 5335W. Vertebrate Social Behavior
  • MCB 3022W. Human Disease and the Development of Therapeutic Agents
  • MCB 3602W. Introduction to Bioinformatic Tools for Microbial Genome Annotation
  • MCB 3841W. Research Literature in Molecular and Cell Biology
  • MCB 3842W. Current Investigations in Cancer Cell Biology
  • MCB 3843W. Research Literature in Comparative Genomics
  • MCB 3845W. Microbial Diversity, Ecology and Evolution
  • MCB 3996W. Research Thesis in Molecular and Cell Biology
  • MCB 4026W. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory
  • MCB 4997W. Honors Research Thesis in Molecular and Cell Biology
  • PNB 3120W. Scientific Writing in Neurobiology
  • PNB 3263WQ. Investigations in Neurobiology
  • PNB 3264W. Molecular Principles of Physiology
  • PNB 4296W. Senior Research Thesis in Physiology and Neurobiology

or any other W course in EEB, MCB, PNB.

Related Courses

Required for Catalog year 2018-2019 and earlier: Complete at least 12 credits of 2000-level or higher related courses. Pick courses from a list of pre-approved biology relateds.

Please view the list of pre-approved related courses on your Academic Requirements Report on Student Admin. Students may also choose courses not included in the pre-approved list, but you must obtain advisor approval.

  • BIOL 1107 & 1108 (BIOL 1110 may be used in place of BIOL 1108) are required for students with catalog year 2012 and after. BIOL 1107 & 1108 can be taken in either order.
  • Math 1131 & 1132 (Calculus I and II) are the only math requirements for the BS degree. Students typically start the calculus sequence during their sophomore year.
  • CHEM 2443 & 2444 (Organic Chemistry) are not required but many biology students (especially those on the pre-med/pre-dental track) take these courses, which can count as related courses (catalog year 2018 and prior). CHEM 2443 is not recommended for first-semester freshmen.
  • Physics is typically taken in junior year and is required for the BS degree.
  • A maximum of 8 2000-level or above transfer credits in EEB, MCB, or PNB can count towards the 36 credits in the major.
  • A maximum of 3 independent study credits from EEB 3899, MCB 3899, MCB 3989, MCB 4989, or PNB 3299 can count toward the 36 credits in the major.
  • Use the Biological Sciences Requirements Worksheet, General Education Audit Sheet, and major sample sequence (below) to keep track of general education requirements and major requirements. These forms list the specific requirements for each catalog year. Visit the Forms page.

Students majoring in Biological Sciences can earn a BS or BA degree. Candidates must complete the CLAS requirements for a BS or BA to receive their degree. While no sample program can apply to every student, the following example assumes that the student has met the foreign language requirement in high school and is pursuing the BS degree.

First Semester (Fall)

BIOL 1107 OR 1108 1 (4 credits)
CHEM 1127Q or 1124Q (4 credits)
Gen Ed (3 credits)
First-year writing or Gen Ed (3-4 credits)
UNIV 1800 (FYE) (1 credit)

Total credits: 15-16

Second Semester (Spring)

BIOL 1108 or 1107 (4 credits)
CHEM 1128Q or 1125Q (3-4 credits)
Gen Ed or Elective (3 credits)
Gen Ed or First-year writing (3 credits)
Total credits: 13-15

Third Semester (Fall)

EEB/MCB/PNB core course 2 (3-4 credits)
MATH 1131Q (4 credits)
CHEM 1126Q or Elective 3 (3 credits)
Non-Major Writing (W) course (3 credits)

Total credits: 13-14

Fourth Semester (Spring)

EEB/MCB/PNB core course (3-4 credits)
Gen Ed (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)
MATH 1132Q (3 credits)
Gen Ed (3 credits)
Total credits: 16-17

Fifth Semester (Fall)

PHYS 1401Q or 1201Q (4 credits)
EEB/MCB/PNB core course (3-4 credits)
EEB/MCB/PNB core course (3-4 credits)
Gen Ed (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)

Total credits: 16-18

Sixth Semester (Spring)

PHYS 1402Q or 1202Q (4 credits)
EEB/MCB/PNB core course (3-4 credits)
EEB/MCB/PNB course (3-4 credits)
Gen Ed (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)

Total credits: 16-18

Seventh Semester (Fall)

3000+ EEB/MCB/PNB course 4 (3-4 credits)
EEB/MCB/PNB core course (3 credits)
Biology writing (W) course (1-4 credits)
Gen Ed (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)

Total credits: 13-17

Eighth Semester (Spring)

3000+ EEB/MCB/PNB course (3-4 credits)
EEB/MCB/PNB course (3 credits)
EEB/MCB/PNB course (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)
Elective (3 credits)

Total credits: 15-16

1 Biology 1110. Introduction to Botany, may be taken in place of BIOL 1108. Pre-dent students should take 1108.

2 BIOL majors must take 36 credits of EEB, MCB, and PNB coursework including one course from each of the following core areas:

  1. Ecology: EEB 2244/W
  2. Evolution: EEB 2245/W
  3. Genetics: MCB 2400 Human Genetics, or MCB 2410 Genetics
  4. Physiology: PNB 2250. Animal Physiology, or both PNB 2274 and 2275. Enhanced Human Physiology & Anatomy
  5. Cells & Molecules: MCB 2000. Introduction to Biochemistry or MCB 2210. Cell Biology or MCB 2215. Honors Cell Biology or MCB 2610. Fundamentals of Microbiology.

** PNB 2264-2265 (and PNB 92501) does not count towards the major in biological sciences.

3 Students interested in pursuing medicine or dentistry should take: CHEM 2443-2444. Organic Chemistry, and CHEM 2445. Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

4 Other than BIOL 2289 and BIOL 3520W, all courses that fulfill the 36-credit group for biological sciences are offered as EEB, MCB, and PNB courses. At least six credits must be 3000 level or higher. Students may apply no more than three independent study (EEB 3899, MCB 3189, MCB 3899, MCB 3989, MCB 4989, PNB 3299) credits and eight transfer credits toward the 36-credit requirement.


One of the following:
MATH 1106 - Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences (3 credits)
MATH 1110 - Calculus I (4 credits)
MATH 1710 - Statistical Theory and Application in the Real World (4 credits)
STSCI 2100 - Introductory Statistics (4 credits)
STSCI 2150 - Introductory Statistics for Biology (cross-listed ILRST) (4 credits)
STSCI 2200 - Biological Statistics I (4 credits)

BTRY 3010-3020, Biological Statistics I and II, sequence is also acceptable for students interested in pursuing statistics in depth (cross-listed STSCI 2200 and 3200).


Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Courses (01:694):

Introduction to Research In Molecular Biology (3) (Spring Synopsis)

Honors Introduction to Research In Molecular Biology (4) (Fall Synopsis)

Analytical Methods in Biology (3) (Fall and Spring Synopsis)

Sophmore Laboratory Research (BA,BA) ( Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis )

Introductory Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (3) ( Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis)

Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory (1) (Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis)

Introduction to Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Research (3) (Spring Synopsis)

Honors Introduction to Research In Molecular Biology (4) ( Fall Synopsis)

Undergraduate Laboratory Research (BA,BA) (Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis)

MBB Seminar, Careers in Science (1) (Fall Synopsis )

Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (3, 3) ( Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis)

Molecular Pathways and Signal Transduction (3) (Fall Synopsis)

Proteomics and Functional Genomics (3) (Spring Synopsis)

Chromatin and Epigenomics (3) (Fall synopsis)

Special Topics in MBB: (3) (Fall Synopsis)

Special Topics in MBB: Biology of Aging (3) (Spring Synopsis)

Special Topics in MBB: Membrane Dynamics in Health and Disease (3) (Spring Synopsis)

Special Topics in MBB: Sickle Cell Anemia (3) ( Spring Syllabus)

Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Research (BA,BA) (Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis)

MBB Seminar, Research Presentations (1) (Spring Synopsis)

Literature Research In Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (3, 3) (Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis)

Gene Regulation In Cancer and Development (3) (Spring Synopsis)

Honors Laboratory Research (6, 6) ( Fall Synopsis | Spring Synopsis)


Biology Pre-Med Courses and Descriptions

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a C or better or 3100:202 with a C or better or 3750:320 with a C or better. Discover how neurons communicate and explore how the brain functions under conditions of normal health, as well as conditions of disease.

Prerequisites: 112 with a grade of C- or better, 211 and prerequisite or corequisite 3150:263. Survey of monera with emphasis on the bacteria: their morphology, cultivation and chemical characteristics. Relationships of microorganisms to humans and their environment. Laboratory.

FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSIOLOGY I

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Fundamentals of physiology including integrating systems (neurophysiology, sensory processes, and endocrinology), movement, and muscle. For all pre-professional students and Biology majors.

FOUNDATIONS IN PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY I

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Corequisite: 3100:363. Laboratory experiments in animal physiology. (Transport processes, neurophysiology, endocrinology, muscle physiology.) Presentation of results in written scientific format.

Prerequisite: 112 with a grade of C- or better. Cellular structure of organs in relation to their functional activity, life history, comparative development. Laboratory.

HUMAN ANATOMY FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a C- or better. Organizing principles and patterns found in human organs and systems. Laboratory integrates creative, analytical and virtual approaches to translate concept into practical application of anatomy.

Prerequisite: 331. Study of major groups of bacteria which produce infections in humans. Biochemical properties of microorganisms which engender virulence and nature of host resistance. Laboratory.

Prerequisite: 211, 311. Nature of antigens, antibody response, and antigen-antibody reactions. Site and mechanism of antibody formations, hypersensitivity, immunologic tolerance and immune diseases considered. Laboratory.

Prerequisite: 437. Immunology is studied from a historical and current perspective. Topics include T cells, B cells, antigen presentation, HIV, and transplantation.

Prerequisites: 112 with a grade of C- or better. Principles of parasitism host parasite interactions important human and veterinary parasitic diseases and control measures. Laboratories parallel lectures.

Prerequisite: 3100: 311 or permission.100% online course. Structure of human cells and tissues and their identification. Functional organization of the human cell and tissues.

Prerequisite: 3100:363 or instructor permission. Through lecture, reading and critical analysis of current literature, physiologic mechanisms of exercise in animals will be explored.

ADVANCED CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY

Prerequisite: 202 or 363 or 473.Study of biological mechanisms involved in heart attack, strokes, fluid balance, hypertension and heart disease. Controversial issues in each area will be examined and current research presented.

Prerequisite: 112 with a grade of C- or better. Lectures focus on development of model vertebrate organisms, and cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying animal development. Laboratory focuses on frog and chick development.

COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE MORPHOLOGY

Prerequisite: 112 with a grade of C- or better. An introduction to the comparative morphology of major vertebrates. The laboratories consist of dissections of representative vertebrates.

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION

Prerequisites: 112 with a grade of C- or better or 202. Study of the physiological mechanisms of reproduction throughout the animal kingdom with emphasis upon mammalian endocrinological control. Controversial issues and current research will be examined.

Prerequisite: 202 or 363 or 473.Study of mechanisms determining gas exchange including mechanics, ventilation, blood flow, diffusion, and control systems. Emphasis is given to normal human lung function. (Clinical aspects are not considered in detail.)

Prerequisite: 211 or equivalent. 202 or 363 or 473.The integrative study of how genetics and physiology influence complex systems from molecular to behavioral in plants and animals. Laboratory.

BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS OF STRESS

Prerequisite: 202 or 363 or 473.Study of mechanisms from molecular to behavioral of how stress influences body systems and signals. The latest research and experimental issues are discussed.

FOUNDATIONS IN PHYSIOLOGY II

Prerequisite: 3100:363. Continuing fundamentals of physiology including metabolism and temperature, respiration and circulation, and osmoregulation. Adaption to extreme environments is emphasized.

FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY II

Prerequisite: 364 corequisite 473.Laboratory experiments in animal physiology (respiration, circulation, metabolism, osmoregulation). Presentation of results in scientific format and as oral reports.

Prerequisite: 112 with a grade of C- or better. The study of how the kidneys affect other body systems and how, in turn, they are affected by these systems.

Prerequisites: 111,112 with grades of C- or better. History of Neuroscience organization, function and development of the central nervous system electrophysiological properties of nerve cells learning and memory molecular basis for mental diseases.

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES IN NEUROSCIENCE

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a C or better or 3100:202 with a C or better or 3750:320 with a C or better. Discover how the most cutting edge neuroscience research techniques are designed and implemented to further our understanding of the brain and visual system.

Prerequisite: 112 with a grade of C- or better and 3150:401. Explores molecular and biochemical aspects of energy metabolism, inter and intracellular signaling, growth and death of cells. Emphasizes up-to-date scientific literature.

CELL PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY

Prerequisite: 112 with a grade of C- or better and 3150:401. Corequisite: 485. Practice of modern cell physiology laboratory techniques. Emphasis on student directed original research.


Biology (3100)

Identification and biology of common plants of this region. Recommended for teachers of nature study. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology. Laboratory.

3100:101 Introduction to Zoology (4 Credits)

Identification and biology of common animals of this region. Recommended for teachers of nature study. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology. Laboratory.

3100:103 Natural Science: Biology (4 Credits)

Designed for non-science majors. Laboratory and class instruction illustrate concepts of living organisms with emphasis on mankind's position in, and influence on, the environment.

Ohio Transfer 36: Yes

Gen Ed: - Natural Science w/LAB

3100:106 Exploring Biology (3 Credits)

Exploration of how science works and the cellular organization, genetic inheritance and diversity of living things. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

Gen Ed: - Natural Science

3100:108 Introduction to Biological Aging (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:103. Survey of normal anatomical and physical changes in aging and associate diseases. (For students in gerontological programs at Wayne College. Not for B.S. biology credit.)

Gen Ed: - Natural Science

3100:111 Principles of Biology I (4 Credits)

Prerequisite or Corequisite: 3150:151 Molecular, cellular basis of life energy transformations, metabolism cell reproduction, genetics, development, immunology, evolution, and origin and diversity of life (through plants). Laboratory.

Ohio Transfer 36: Yes

Gen Ed: - Natural Science w/LAB

3100:112 Principles of Biology II (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:111 with a grade of C- or better. Animal diversity nutrients, gas exchange, transport, homeostasis, control in plants and animals behavior ecology. (3100:111 and 3100:112 are an integrated course for biology majors.) Laboratory.

Ohio Transfer 36: Yes

Gen Ed: - Natural Science w/LAB

3100:113 Professional Development for Biology Majors (1 Credit)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: 3100:111. This course is for Biology majors in their first year of study to provide useful tools as they pursue a Biology career. Recommended, not required.

3100:130 Principles of Microbiology (3 Credits)

Basic principles and terminology of microbiology cultivation and control of microorganisms relationships of microorganisms medical microbiology. Laboratory. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

Ohio Transfer 36: Yes

Gen Ed: - Natural Science w/LAB

3100:131 The Biology of Monsters (1 Credit)

Many movie monsters use exaggerations or extrapolations of real biological concepts. This course uses monsters to teach key biological concepts in a fun and accessible way. A short lecture is followed by a screening of the movie.

3100:180 BS/MD Orientation (1 Credit)

Orientation to the BS/MD Program. Restricted to students in the BS/MD Program. Graded credit/no credit. Not available for credit toward a biology degree.

3100:190 Health-Care Delivery Systems (1 Credit)

Health-care principles and practices. Restricted to the student in NEOUCOM, six-year BS/MD program. Graded credit/noncredit. Not available toward credit as major in biological sciences.

3100:191 Health-Care Delivery Systems (1 Credit)

Health-care principles and practices. Restricted to the student in NEOUCOM, six-year BS/MD program. Graded credit/noncredit. Not available toward credit as major in biological sciences.

3100:200 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3 Credits)

Study of structure and function of the human body. Molecular, cellular function, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, and the sense organs. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

Ohio Transfer 36: Yes

Gen Ed: - Natural Science

3100:201 Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory I (1 Credit)

Laboratory devised to allow hands on experience using models, dissections of various animals, virtual dissection, and physiological exercises. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

3100:202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:200. Study of structure and function of the human body. Endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatics, respiratory system, urinary system, digestive system, and reproductive systems. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

Gen Ed: - Natural Science

3100:203 Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory II (1 Credit)

Laboratory devised to allow hands on experience using models, dissections of various animals, virtual dissection, and physiological exercises. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

3100:211 General Genetics (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of 3100:112 with a grade of "C-" or better. Principles of heredity, principles of genetics.

3100:212 Genetics Laboratory (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade C- or better, and prerequisite or corequisite: 3100:211. Laboratory experiments in genetics with emphasis on scientific method techniques in molecular biology.

3100:217 General Ecology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Completion of 3100:112 with a grade of "C-" or better. Study of interrelationships between organisms and environment.

3100:225 Biology of AIDS (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: Permission. Course examines the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the disease of AIDS. Virus structure, replication, therapy, transmission, epidemiology, disease process and social consequences are studied. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

3100:238 Biomimicry Foundations (3 Credits)

An introduction to biomimicry through the analysis of case studies, including those from Northeast Ohio, and a consideration of the major tools and methods.

3100:265 Introductory Human Physiology (4 Credits)

Study of physiological processes in human body, particularly at organ-systems level. Not open to preprofessional majors. Laboratory. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

Gen Ed: - Natural Science w/LAB

3100:290 Health-Care Delivery Systems (1 Credit)

Health-care principles and practices. A continuation of 190/191 for a second year student in NEOUCOM six-year BS/MD program. Graded credit/noncredit. Not available toward credit as major in biological sciences.

3100:291 Health-Care Delivery Systems (1 Credit)

Health-care principles and practices. A continuation of 190/191 for a second year student in NEOUCOM six-year BS/MD program. Graded credit/noncredit. Not available toward credit as major in biological sciences.

3100:295 Special Topics in Biology (1-3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Permission. Special courses offered occasionally in areas where no formal course exists. Not available for credit toward a degree in biology.

3100:311 Cell & Molecular Biology (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3150:151, 3150:152, 3150:153, 3150:154, and 3100:211. Study of structure and function of cells, with emphasis on both classical and modern approaches to understanding organelles, energy balance, protein synthesis, and replication.

3100:312 Neuroscience in Health and Disease (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a C or better or 3100:202 with a C or better or 3750:320 with a C or better. Discover how neurons communicate and explore how the brain functions under conditions of normal health, as well as conditions of disease.

3100:315 Evolutionary Biology Discussion (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: 3100:211 with a grade of C- or better. Informal discussions of various aspects of organic evolution of general or special interest.

3100:316 Evolutionary Biology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Description of core evolutionary concepts and the history of evolutionary thought including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift, higher level selection and speciation.

3100:318 Biomimicry Design Challenge (3 Credits)

A studio design course using nature as a model for creating innovative solutions targeting a specific design problem. It combines a brief introduction into biomimetics and is open to students from different disciplines in the arts, sciences, and engineering.

3100:331 Microbiology (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112, 3100:211, and 3150:263 (or corequisite). Survey of monera with emphasis on the bacteria: their morphology, cultivation and chemical characteristics. Relationships of microorganisms to humans and their environment. Laboratory.

3100:342 Flora & Taxonomy (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a C- or better. Origins of Ohio flora, ecological and evolutionary relationships. Survey of local flowering plant families, collection and identification of flora. Laboratory and field trips.

3100:343 Diversity of Plants (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, and 3100:217. A broad survey of the traditional plant "branches" of the tree of life. Diversity, structure, and function of fungi, algae, and land plants.

3100:344 Diversity of Plant Laboratory (2 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, and 3100:217: Corequisite: 3100:343. A broad laboratory survey of the traditional plant "branches" of the tree of life. Students will have hands-on experience with fungi, algae, and land plants.

3100:345 Biology of Vascular Plants (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. A lecture and laboratory course which presents an overview of the anatomy, morphology, development and evolution of vascular plants.

3100:363 Foundations of Physiology I (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Fundamentals of physiology including integrating systems (neurophysiology, sensory processes, and endocrinology), movement, and muscle. For all pre-professional students and Biology majors.

3100:364 Foundations of Physiology Laboratory I (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Corequisite: 3100:363. Laboratory experiments in animal physiology. (Transport processes, neurophysiology, endocrinology, muscle physiology.) Presentation of results in written scientific format.

3100:365 Histology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Cellular structure of organs in relation to their functional activity, life history, comparative development. Laboratory.

3100:367 Genomics (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:111 and 3100:112. Study of genomes from all branches of life to develop a deeper understanding of functional genomics, genomic architecture, and impacts (ethical and social) of advances in genomics.

3100:401 Human Anatomy for Biology Majors (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a C- or better. Organizing principles and patterns found in human organs and systems. Laboratory integrates creative, analytical and virtual approaches to translate concept into practical application of anatomy.

3100:404 Digital Skills for Biologists (3 Credits)

This course teaches students with no prior experience the fundamentals of programming, electronics, 3D printing, actuation and robotics for application to biological experiments.

3100:406 Principles of Systematics (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, and 3100:211, and 3100:316. The science of identifying, naming, and classifying the diversity of life. Topics include: nomenclature, types, techniques of data collection, and methods of phylogenetic reconstruction.

3100:418 Field Ecology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:217 (statistics strongly recommended). Introduction to sampling methods, design of experiments and observations, and computer analysis some local natural history. Laboratory.

3100:421 Tropical Field Biology (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Completion of courses 3100:111 and 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, or equivalent. Ecology of coral reefs, tide pools, mangroves, intertidal zones, terrestrial flora and fauna, island biogeography. Taught at a field station in the tropics. Field trips involved transportation costs.

3100:422 Conservation Biology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:217. Explores the factors affecting survival of biodiversity, and how to develop practical approaches to resolve complicated conservation issues.

3100:423 Population Biology (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:211 and 3100:217. Discussions of animal and plant ecology and evolutionary biology from a species and population level perspective. Includes topics in population ecology and population genetics.

3100:426 Wetland Ecology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:217. Wetland ecology principles and conservation. Field studies will be conducted at Bath Nature Preserve. Laboratory.

3100:427 Freshwater Ecology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, or by permission. The course explores the diversity of aquatic life and key characteristics of freshwater ecosystems with emphasis on the Laurentian Great Lakes. Includes field trips, laboratory.

3100:428 Biology of Behavior (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:211, 3100:217, and 3100:316. Biological basis of behavior, ethology, and behavioral ecology. An evolutionary perspective is emphasized.

3100:429 Biology of Behavior Laboratory (1 Credit)

Prerequisite or corequisite: 3100:428 and permission of instructor. Individualized, directed study to provide the student with first-hand experience in observing, describing and interpreting animal behavior.

3100:430 Community/Ecosystem Ecology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:217. An examination of the components, processes, and dynamics in communities and ecosystems. Includes reading and discussion of primary literature.

3100:433 Medical Microbiology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:331. Pathogenic microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, helminthes, and how they cause disease host-pathogen interactions and the function of the immune response in controlling disease. Laboratory.

3100:437 Immunology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:211 and 3100:311. Nature of antigens, antibody response, and antigen-antibody reactions. Site and mechanism of antibody formations, hypersensitivity, immunologic tolerance and immune diseases considered. Laboratory.

3100:439 Advanced Immunology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:437. Immunology is studied from a historical and current perspective. Topics include T cells, B cells, antigen presentation, HIV, and transplantation.

3100:440 Mycology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Structure, life history, classification of representative fungi with emphasis on the importance of fungi to humans. Laboratory.

3100:443 Phycology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Examination of the major groups of algae with emphasis on life histories and their relationship to algal form and structure. Laboratory.

3100:444 Field Marine Phycology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Collection and identification of tropical marine algae on San Salvador Island, The Bahamas. Discussion of characteristics and ecology of major groups of Caribbean algae. Laboratory.

3100:451 General Entomology (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, and 3100:217. Structure, physiology, life cycles, economic importance and characteristics of orders and major families of insects. Laboratories parallel lectures.

3100:453 Invertebrate Zoology (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, and 3100:217. Invertebrate groups, their classification, functional morphology, adaptive radiation and life history. A phylogenetic approach is used. Laboratories parallel lectures.

3100:454 Parasitology (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Principles of parasitism host parasite interactions important human and veterinary parasitic diseases and control measures. Laboratories parallel lectures.

3100:455 Ichthyology (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:217. Study of fishes incorporates aspects of evolution, anatomy, physiology, natural history, and commercial exploitation of fishes. Laboratory incorporates field-based exercises and fish taxonomy.

3100:456 Ornithology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Introduction to biology of birds: classification, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, evolution, natural history and field identification. Laboratory and field trips.

3100:457 Herpetology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Survey of the diversity, ecology and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. Special emphasis is given to Ohio species. Laboratory.

3100:458 Vertebrate Zoology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:316 or permission. Biology of vertebrates, except birds evolution, ecology, behavior, systematics and anatomy. Laboratory with field trips.

3100:460 Medical Histology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:311. 100% online course. Structure of human cells and tissues and their identification. Functional organization of the human cell and tissues.

3100:463 Exercise Physiology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:363 or instructor permission. Through lecture, reading and critical analysis of current literature, physiologic mechanisms of exercise in animals will be explored.

3100:465 Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:202, or 3100:363, or 3100:473. Study of biological mechanisms involved in heart attack, strokes, fluid balance, hypertension and heart disease. Controversial issues in each area will be examined and current research presented.

3100:466 Vertebrate Embryology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. Lectures focus on development of model vertebrate organisms, and cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying animal development.

3100:467 Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. An introduction to the comparative morphology of major vertebrates. The laboratories consist of dissections of representative vertebrates.

3100:468 The Physiology of Reproduction (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better, or 3100:202. Study of the physiological mechanisms of reproduction throughout the animal kingdom with emphasis upon mammalian endocrinological control. Controversial issues and current research will be examined.

3100:469 Respiratory Physiology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:202, or 3100:363, or 3100:473. Study of mechanisms determining gas exchange including mechanics, ventilation, blood flow, diffusion, and control systems. Emphasis is given to normal human lung function. (Clinical aspects are not considered in detail.)

3100:470 Lab Animal Regulations (1 Credit)

Required of anyone working with animals, and covers government regulations, care of animals and a lab to teach basic animal handling and measurement techniques.

3100:471 Physiological Genetics (4 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:211 or equivalent and [3100:202, or 3100:363, or 3100:473]. The integrative study of how genetics and physiology influence complex systems from molecular to behavioral in plants and animals. Laboratory.

3100:472 Biological Mechanisms of Stress (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:202, or 3100:363, or 3100:473. Study of mechanisms from molecular to behavioral of how stress influences body systems and signals. The latest research and experimental issues are discussed.

3100:473 Foundations of Physiology II (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:363. Continuing fundamentals of physiology including metabolism and temperature, respiration and circulation, and osmoregulation. Adaption to extreme environments is emphasized.

3100:474 Foundations of Physiology Laboratory II (1 Credit)

Prerequisite: 3100:364 corequisite 3100:473. Laboratory experiments in animal physiology (respiration, circulation, metabolism, osmoregulation). Presentation of results in scientific format and as oral reports.

3100:475 Comparative Biomechanics (3 Credits)

Investigation of how physical constraints on biological materials, structural mechanics and locomotion relate to the survival and evolution of living organisms.

3100:478 Renal Physiology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better. The study of how the kidneys affect other body systems and how, in turn, they are affected by these systems.

3100:480 Molecular Biology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:211 and 3100:311. Fundamentals of molecular biology, including recombinant DNA technology, applications in biotechnology, medicine, and genetic engineering. Mechanisms of gene regulation.

3100:481 Advanced Genetics (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:211. Nature of the gene genetic codes hereditary determinants mutagenesis and genes in population. Lecture and seminar.

3100:482 Neurobiology (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: Completion of 3100:111 and 3100:112 with a grade of "C-" or better. History of Neuroscience organization, function and development of the central nervous system electrophysiological properties of nerve cells learning and memory molecular basis for mental diseases.

3100:483 Research Techniques in Neuroscience (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: [3100:112, or 3100:202, or 3750:320] with a C or better. Discover how the most cutting edge neuroscience research techniques are designed and implemented to further our understanding of the brain and visual system.

3100:485 Cell Physiology (3 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better and 3150:401. Explores molecular and biochemical aspects of energy metabolism, inter and intracellular signaling, growth and death of cells. Emphasizes up-to-date scientific literature.

3100:486 Cell Physiology Laboratory (2 Credits)

Prerequisite: 3100:112 with a grade of C- or better and 3150:401. Corequisite: 3100:485. Practice of modern cell physiology laboratory techniques. Emphasis on student directed original research.

3100:494 Workshop in Biology (1-3 Credits)

(May be repeated) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Group studies of special topics in biology. May not be used to meet undergraduate or graduate major requirements in biology. May be used for elective credit only.

3100:495 Special Topics in Biology (1-3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Permission. Special courses offered occasionally in areas where no formal course exists.

3100:496 Internship in Biology (1-3 Credits)

(May be repeated for maximum of 6 credits) Prerequisites: Permission of department and a minimum 3.0 GPA in Biology courses (20 credits minimum). Work experience to focus on career applications in Biology. Maximum 3 credits will count towards Biology electives.

3100:497 Biological Problems (1-3 Credits)

(May be repeated for a total of 6 credits) Prerequisites: Permission of department, 2.0 GPA or better in Biology coursework, and currently in the College of Arts & Sciences. Advanced level work, usually consisting of laboratory investigations. A maximum of 4 credits may apply toward the major degree requirements.

3100:499 Senior Honors Program in Biology (1-3 Credits)

(May be repeated for a total of five credits) Prerequisites: senior standing in Honors College and approval of honors preceptor. Open only to biology and natural sciences divisional majors in Honors College. Independent study leading to completion of approved senior honors.


  • MATH 1106 - Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences (3 credits)
  • MATH 1110 - Calculus I (4 credits)
  • MATH 1710 - Statistical Theory and Application in the Real World (4 credits)
  • STSCI 2100 - Introductory Statistics (4 credits)
  • STSCI 2150 - Introductory Statistics for Biology (4 credits)
  • STSCI 2200 - Biological Statistics I (4 credits)

BTRY 3010-3020, Biological Statistics I and II, sequence is also acceptable for students interested in pursuing statistics in depth (cross-listed STSCI 2200 and 3200).


Academic Programs Biology

2 weeks) the trip component of the course helps to solidify student learning through experiential learning. Two hours lecture, field trip to Costa Rica. Prerequisite: Biology 118 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring. BIOL-330 Mycology (4 credits) Introduces fungi with emphasis on ecology, morphology and taxonomy of representative groups. Two hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119 and 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. BIOL-330L Mycology Lab Introduces fungi with emphasis on ecology, morphology and taxonomy of representative groups. Two hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119 and 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. BIOL-331 Genetics (4 credits) Fundamental principles of inheritance in animals, plants, and microorganisms with emphasis on molecular genetics. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 119 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better. Fall, spring. BIOL-331L Genetics Lab Fundamental principles of inheritance in animals, plants, and microorganisms with emphasis on molecular genetics. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 119 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better. Fall, spring. BIOL-333 Animal Behavior (3 credits) Studies the principles of biological rhythms, migration, aggression, competition, learning, reproduction, and social behavior of animals. Three hours lecture, field studies. Prerequisite: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring. BIOL-340 Cellular and Molecular Biology (4 credits) Covers the principles of eukaryotic cell structure and function and the molecular bases of cellular processes. Topics will include: macromolecules energetics membranes cellular organelles gene expression signaling cell division DNA replication RNA and protein synthesis and processing and molecular aspects of immunology, cancer and recombinant DNA technology. The course will build on the survey knowledge from the required prerequisite courses. Prerequisite: BIOL 331 or permission of instructor. Spring. BIOL-340L Cellular & Molecular Biology Lab Lab course to accompany BIOL 340 lecture. BIOL-350 Vertebrate Zoology (4 credits) Emphasizes the taxonomy, comparative morphology, behavior, and life history of vertebrates. Three hours lecture, three hours lab, field studies. Prerequisite: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring. BIOL-350L Vertebrate Zoology Lab Emphasizes the taxonomy, comparative morphology, behavior, and life history of vertebrates. Three hours lecture, three hours lab, field studies. Prerequisite: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring. BIOL-360 Summer Field Station Study (1-3 credits) Biology studies conducted at a marine, freshwater,mountain, or desert field station. Summer. BIOL-399 Special Topics in Biology (1-4 credits) Lectures, discussions, or special laboratory topics not covered in regular course offerings. Provides greater depth to topics of special interest or explores rapidly changing areas in biology. May be repeated. Prerequisites announced when specific topics scheduled. BIOL-414 Plant Diversity (4 credits) Studies the identification and classification of local vascular plants. Herbarium collection required. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years. BIOL-414L Plant Diversity Lab Studies the identification and classification of local vascular plants. Herbarium collection required. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years. BIOL-415 Biostatistics Computational Biology (4 credits) Explores biological systems using quantitative biological models. Application of statistical tools, numerical data sets, and computer-based techniques to test hypotheses, create predictive models, and interpret results and patterns. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 320 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years. BIOL-415L Biostatistics Lab Explores biological systems using quantitative biological models. Application of statistical tools, numerical data sets, and computer-based techniques to test hypotheses, create predictive models, and interpret results and patterns. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 320 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years. BIOL-423 Ecology (4 credits) Examines how organisms interact with each other and with their environment. Addresses the physical environment and the way physiological adaptations organisms have evolved to exploit it, population dynamics, interactions between species populations, biogeography, and environmental issues, especially those that relate to the impact of humans on the ecology of natural populations of plants and animals. Three hours lecture, three hours lab, field studies. Prerequisite: Biology 320 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years. BIOL-423L Ecology Lab Examines how organisms interact with each other and with their environment. Addresses the physical environment and the way physiological adaptations organisms have evolved to exploit it, population dynamics, interactions between species populations, biogeography and environmental issues, especially those that relate to the impact of humans on the ecology of natural populations of plants and animals. Three hours lecture, three hours lab, field studies. Prerequisite: Biology 320 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better. Fall, alternate years. BIOL-425 Developmental Biology (4 credits) Studies the cellular, genetic, and molecular interactions of animal development. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 331 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years. BIOL-425L Developmental Biology Lab Studies the cellular, genetic, and molecular interactions of animal development. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 331 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years. BIOL-427 Animal Physiology (4 credits) Studies the normal functions of animal organs and systems. Topics include metabolism, transmission of nerve impulses, reproduction, and effects of hormones. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119 or 120 and Chemistry 240 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Fall. BIOL-427L Animal Physiology Lab Studies the normal functions of animal organs and systems. Topics include metabolism, transmission of nerve impulses, reproduction, and effects of hormones. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119 or 120, and Chemistry 240 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Fall. BIOL-428 Plant Physiology (4 credits) Major biological activities of higher plants with emphasis on water relations, mineral nutrition, metabolism, growth, and development. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 120 and Chemistry 118 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. BIOL-428L Plant Physiology Lab Major biological activities of higher plants with emphasis on water relations, mineral nutrition, metabolism, growth, and development. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 120 and Chemistry 118 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. BIOL-430 Microbiology (4 credits) Covers general principles of bacterial growth and activities. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 119 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 120 with a grade of C- or better. Fall. BIOL-430L Microbiology Lab Covers general principles of bacterial growth and activities. Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Prerequisite: Biology 119 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 119 with a grade of C- or better. Fall. BIOL-434 Parasitology (4 credits) Studies the nature of parasitism with respect to morphology, physiology, and host parasite relationships. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119 or 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years. BIOL-434L Parasitology Lab Studies the nature of parasitism with respect to morphology, physiology, and host parasite relationships. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119 and 120 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years. BIOL-436 Human Physiology (3 credits) A detailed study of human function, beginning at a cellular level. Emphasis is placed on the neuromuscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and endocrine systems. The effects of exercise and pathology are integrated into each system. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 431 or permission of the instructor. Fall. BIOL-440 Cell Biology (4 credits) Studies the basic principles and information that form the foundation of cell biology, provides exposure to some of the underlying questions of cell biology, and improves skills in analyzing and communicating scientific information. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 340 and Chemistry 240 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring. BIOL-440L Cell Biology Lab Studies the basic principles and information that form the foundation of cell biology, provides exposure to some of the underlying questions of cell biology, and improves skills in analyzing and communicating scientific information. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 107 or 117, 108, 331, and Chemistry 240 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Spring. BIOL-442 Immunology (4 credits) Studies cellular and molecular aspects of the immune response. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119, 120, 340 and Chemistry 240 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years. BIOL-442L Immunology Lab Studies cellular and molecular aspects of the immune response. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 119, 120, and 340 and Chemistry 240 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years. BIOL-445 Molecular Biology (4 credits) Considers the molecular aspects of biology at the cellular and subcellular levels. Emphasis on the genetic material and intercellular processes and laboratory procedures for studying biology at the molecular level. Three hours lecture three hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 331 and Chemistry 240, 341 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 440. Fall, alternate years. BIOL-445L Molecular Biology Lab Considers the molecular aspects of biology at the cellular and subcellular levels. Emphasis on the genetic material and intercellular processes and laboratory procedures for studying biology at the molecular level. Three hours lecture three hours lab. Prerequisites: Biology 331 and Chemistry 240, 341 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 440. Fall, alternate years. BIOL-450 Evolution (3 credits) Addresses a variety of topics related to evolutionary biology, including the history of evolutionary thought, evolution of sex, group selection, speciation, phylogenetic systematics, coevolution, and molecular evolution. Three hours lecture. Prerequisite: Biology 320 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 119. Spring,alternate years. BIOL-455 Genomics in Research & Medicine (4 credits) Examines current tools and techniques in genomics research and discusses applications of genomics, especially in healthcare and medicine. Topics include the use of home genomics kits to infer ancestry and predict health outcomes genomics and personalized medicine genomics in species conservation and evolution, etc. Students will also use a variety of genomics tools to investigate a novel genomics research problem. BIOL-455L Research Problems in Genomics Lab BIOL-460 Special Problems (1-3 credits) Independent research of a biological problem under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Repeatable course. Fall, spring. BIOL-480 Senior Seminar I (2 credits) Focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of biology and how life sciences relate to contemporary problems and circumstances. Involves investigative projects, written reports, and presentation of reviews. Prerequisites: At least one 400-level biology course senior standing. Fall. BIOL-481 Senior Seminar II (2 credits) Focuses on interdisciplinary nature of biology and how life sciences relate to contemporary problems and circumstances. Involves written and oral analysis of class material. Prerequisites: At least one 400-level biology course senior standing. Spring. BIOL-482 Biology Senior Seminar (3 credits) Focuses on interdisciplinary nature of biology problems and circumstances. Involves investigative projects, written reports, presentation of reviews, and integrative book reviews primarily in seminar format. Prerequisites: at least one 400-level biology class. BIOL-498 Internship in Biology (1-6 credits) Internships are designed to meet the educational needs of students' professional goals and to provide practical experience in a position relating to a specific area of career interest. Developed by the student in conjunction with a faculty supervisor and site supervisor. Repeatable course. BIOL-499 Special Topics in Biology (1-4 credits) Lectures, discussions, or special laboratory topics not covered in regular course offerings. Provides greater depth to topics of special interest or explores rapidly changing areas in biology. May be repeated. Prerequisites announced when specific topics scheduled. BIOL-536 Human Physiology (3 credits) A detailed study of human function, beginning at a cellular level. Emphasis is placed on the neuromuscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and endocrine systems. The effects of exercise and pathology are integrated into each system. Prerequisite: Physical Therapy 531 or permission of the instructor. Fall.

Office Phone:
812-488-2024

Office Email:
Dale Edwards ([email protected])

Office Location:
Room 231, Koch Center for Engineering and Science


Watch the video: Animal Physiology (May 2022).